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Self Help Tools

Divorce, Custody, & Family
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We offer this classroom to help you through the process of getting a divorce in Maine. We hope that this will help you feel more confident about dealing with the legal system. Is this classroom for you? You may use this classroom if:
In Maine, some grandparents may ask a court to give them contact or visitation with their grandchildren.  But, children’s parents usually have the right to decide how to raise their children including if the grandparents can see their grandchildren.  Therefore, except in urgent cases or where the grandparents have actually acted...
Help for people doing their own divorce - or other family law - case in Maine.
We have put together several forms kits - they have all the forms you will need for certain kinds of divorce or parental rights and responsibilities cases. You can use these kits, or you can find a particular form you need from the All Court Forms page. 
How do I know if my child’s sexualized behavior is normal or a sign of abuse? Some child sexualized behavior is normal. Other behavior may be a sign of abuse. Here are some resources that may help you know the difference: 
This is the second part of our guide to Child Protection proceedings in Maine. It covers what can happen when DHHS investigates a household because they believe that a child may be at risk of being harmed.
This guide is the first in a series about what happens when DHHS gets involved with families. This guide covers the very first steps in the Maine Child Protection process - our other guides cover later parts of this process. If you are in a situation where DHHS is becoming involved with your family, start here.
How does domestic violence affect children? Violence and trauma can have long-lasting effects on children who witness or experience violent events.
About DHHS and Child Abuse and Neglect DHHS Child Protective Services investigates reports of child abuse. There are 5 different things that DHHS can do:
What is the Maine Home Court Act? The Home Court Act is a Maine law passed in 2016. It is meant to prevent more than one case about the same child from happening in different courts. Courts use the Jurisdictional Affidavit to find out about all of the cases involving a child. They do this to make sure they are following the Act.

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