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Miscellaneous

Controversy and Jurisdictional Disputes Regarding Elvers

The controversy over regulating the Passamaquoddy fisheries is part of a larger problem that arises under the Maine Implementation Act. The question is whether the state of Maine has jurisdiction to limit subsistence practices in open waters.

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New Rules Allow Tribal Members to Gather Plants on National Park Land

New Rules Allow Tribal Members to Gather Plants on National Park Land

Wabanaki Legal News, Fall 2016

By James Mitchell, Esq.

 

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A Website to Help Those Who Serve: Stateside Legal

Stateside Legal is a website that Pine Tree Legal Assistance created that has helpful, current, and easy to read information on benefits and laws that affect service members, veterans, and the family members who support them. 

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MITSC Documents Humanitarian Crisis Faced by Wabanaki Tribes Within the State of Maine Due to Maine Indian Claims Settlement Act & Maine Implementing Act Commission Calls for Action To Address Human Rights Crisis

Responding to a request from UN Special Rapporteur on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples James Anaya, the Maine Indian Tribal-State Commission (MITSC) recently submitted a fourteen page letter and twenty-one documents supplementing its original filing of May 16, 2012 asserting that the Maine Indian Claims Settlement Act (MICSA) and Maine Implementing Act (MIA) “have created structural inequities that have resulted in conditions that have risen to the level of human rights violations.” 

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It’s Your Money – You Earned It – Now Claim It

Generally Native Americans pay federal income tax on earnings with the exception of income exempt by specific treaty, agreement, or Act of Congress. For example, tribes in Oregon and Washington have fishing rights established by treaties with the U.S., so income from fishing by tribal members is exempt from federal income tax.

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New Protections for Religious Rights of Native Prisoners

Native spiritual gatherings in prison
are essential to the survival of tribal communities.

Wabanaki Legal News, Spring 2009 edition
by Paul Thibeault (opinion)

The Sipayik Criminal Justice Commission has been negotiating with the Maine Department of Corrections (DOC) about restrictions on the rights of Native prisoners to practice traditional Indian religion. The negotiations were supported by the Maine Indian Tribal State Commission. As a result of these efforts, some big changes have been made:

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Problems with the IRS?

WE MAY BE ABLE TO HELP!  Pine Tree Legal Assistance’s Low-Income Taxpayer Clinic (LITC) offers free representation to qualifying taxpayers.

Call 942-8241 to speak to one of our LITC advocates today.

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Health Care Advance Directives Should Accompany Your Will

In the last edition of Wabanaki Legal News, we told you about wills and why you might want one. In this article, we talk about “Advance Directives.” They are important documents that control how you are cared for when you can no longer care for yourself.

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Natives on Tribal Land Can Still Get TANF after 5 Years

Certain families can get extensions of TANF beyond 5 years for certain reasons such as disability in the household.

Certain Native American families may never lose their TANF, even after 60 months. Under federal and state law, there is an exemption for people who get TANF who live on Indian Reservations where at least 50% of the adults are not employed.

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