Library

A General Description of the Divorce Process

Wabanaki Legal News, Winter 2012 The Parties to the Divorce The wife and husband are called "the parties to the divorce." How the Process is Started The party who first asks the court for a divorce is called the Plaintiff.  The other party is the Defendant.   The Plaintiff must file a document with the court called a “Complaint For Divorce.”  The Complaint for Divorce form an more...

Be Aware of the Long-term Consequences of Criminal Activity

Wabanaki Legal News, Winter 2012 There may be long-term consequences if you plead or are found guilty of a crime.  A criminal conviction or juvenile adjudication can impact your life in many ways. What is a Juvenile Adjudication? The Maine Juvenile Code applies to a person who is under 18 years old at the time he or she was accused of committing a crime.  The state or tribal court “adjudicates” a juvenile if he or she admits to co more...

Debt Collection: Understanding Your Rights

Wabanaki Legal News, Winter 2012 When a creditor is trying to collect a debt from you, the law gives the creditor ways to try to collect that money through court.  Even if you only co-signed a loan for another person, you are still responsible for that debt just as if you had taken out the loan yourself.   When you receive any type of notice from tribal or state court about a debt that you owe or co-signed for, or notice that a creditor is trying to colle more...

Executive Order Calls for State Agencies to Consult Maine Tribes

Wabanaki Legal News, Summer 2010 On February 25, 2010 Maine Governor John Baldacci signed an executive order requiring state agencies to meet with tribes before passing laws or rules that could affect Wabanaki people. The order calls on each agency to draft policies and guidelines for meeting with tribal governments. According to the order these policies should promote: two-way communication between Maine's agencies and tribes   positive re more...

Former Residential School Students in Canada Can Get Payments

Former students of Canadian residential schools are entitled to receive money to address the harms and abuses they suffered at the schools. These are the boarding schools that operated throughout Canada for over a century. About 80,000 former students are still living. more...

Pages